Ooh, Interesting! – Dion Dublin and the Dube

August 07, 2015


In this week’s regular feature, we take a look at former footballer and Homes Under the Hammer presenter Dion Dublin and the intriguingly named ‘Dube’.

There’s a lot to like about Dion Dublin. He seems friendly when presenting on TV, was a solid fantasy football choice back in the nineties and admirably recovered from a horrendous neck injury to continue playing football professionally. But what you may not be aware of is that he has invented his own instrument, The Dube. Not only that, but you can buy it too.

The Dube is similar in design to a cajon, its cube structure no doubt helping to form its name (Dublin + Cube = Dube). A percussion instrument, it was created due to Dion’s passion for music and the first prototype was six pieces of wood and a few nails. After altering the design a little over the years, four sizes of Dube now exist and it’s proven a hit in schools.

With each side of a Dion Dublin Dube (or a '3D'?) offering a different sound, it’s certainly an interesting instrument and perhaps worth exploring further. If you’re wanting to purchase one, they’re between £117.50 and £320. For a full set of Dubes (Dubai?), it’s a pricey instrument but to show off just one to your mates in a, “Hey, you’ll never guess what I own,” kind of way when music comes up in conversation, it’s not a bad investment. And between you and us, we think it looks quite good. Nice work, Dion Dublin.

 

 






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By Henry Fosdike